Vote Sign

A sign marks the entrance to the Chittenden 10-1 and Chittenden/Grand Isle district polls in Milton, Aug. 11. 

The Sun has a quick roundup of Tuesday's results and what voters can expect when they go to cast their ballots this fall.

Were there any surprises in the primary results?

No. In those races where incumbents faced a primary challenge, the incumbent won handily, including Rep. Peter Welch, Gov. Phil Scott and state auditor Doug Hoffer.

In the race for the Democratic nomination for governor, Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman bested former Secretary of Education Rebecca Holcombe by 10 points. Zuckerman, a longtime Progressive and Democratic senator from Chittenden County before serving two terms as the lieutenant governor, had the backing of Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Our Revolution, the national progressive group which grew out of Sanders' 2016 Presidential campaign.

In the race to replace Zuckerman, Tim Ashe, also a Democratic and Progressive senator from Chittenden County, lacked that endorsement. He lost to Molly Gray, an assistant attorney general who had never run for political office. Gray had the support of many of the Democratic Party's heavy hitters, including Welch, and former governors Madeleine Kunin and Peter Shumlin. She bested Ashe, the current leader of the Vermont Senate, by 10 points.

Gray will face Republican Scott Milne in November. Milne has never held elective office, but has run for governor and the U.S. Senate.

Who will be on Colchester's House candidates ballot this fall?

Chittenden 9-1

Four candidates will compete for 9-1's two House seats. Two incumbent Democrats, will face off against two Republicans. 

Seth Chase, a Democrat, is a life-long Vermonter and U.S. Army veteran. He graduated from the University of Vermont with a degree in business and information systems and now works as a network engineer.

Curt Taylor will also be on the ballot as a Democrat. He's worked as a school teacher, newspaper reporter and database programmer, but is now a member of the Colchester school board. 

Deserae Morin is a Republican who ran unsuccessfully for a Colchester House seat in 2018. She is running again with the campaign slogan, "A working mother, for the working family."

Doug Wood is also running as a Republican to represent Chittenden 9-1. 

Chittenden 9-2

Three candidates will compete for two seats in Chittenden 9-2. Long-time representative Patrick Brennan will have competition from fellow incumbent Sarita Austin and new-comer Jon Lynch. 

Patrick Brennan is a Republican who moved to Colchester since 1985. He has served on numerous town and county boards, and has been a State representative since 2003. 

Jon Lynch, also a Republican, was born and raised in Northern England, but has lived in Colchester for the past 18 years. He is the vice president of engineering for Monster.com.

Sarita Austin is the only Democrat running for a house seat in 9-2. Before running the House, she worked as a teacher and councilor in area schools for many years. 

What's the Senate race look like?

Democrat incumbent Dick Richard “Dick” Mazza is once again running for the Grand Isle District’s lone seat in the Vermont Senate--seeking his 19th term as a state senator. He will be the only candidate from one of the major parties to be listed on the ballot.

What do I have to do to vote in November?

General election ballots will be mailed to every registered voter. 

To register, contact your local town clerk or online at the Secretary of State's website (sos.vermont.gov/elections/voters/registration). 

There is no deadline to register, but those registering close to or on election day should do so through their town clerk, as an online registration may not be processed quickly enough to allow you to vote. 

Registered voters can also call the clerk or visit the Secretary of State's My Voter page (mvp.vermont.gov).

Can I still go to the polls?

Yes. Polls will still be open. Voters can both return their mailed ballot in the accompanying sealed envelope or vote as they have in the past.

However, because of COVID-19, towns may be changing where polling stations are located to allow for more social distancing. Be sure to check with your town office or the Secretary of State's website for your polling location.

Written By

Staff Writer

Bridget Higdon is a Staff Writer. She was previously the editor-in-chief of The Vermont Cynic, UVM's independent newspaper. She’s been published in Seven Days, Editor & Publisher and Vermont Vacation Guide. She likes to cook and explore Vermont by bike.

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